Clear Up the Fog

How often do Sabbath School leaders share their faith? I’m not talking about sharing our 28 fundamental beliefs or talking to our coworkers about the Sabbath—though these things are important. I’m addressing sharing our faith in the relationships that we have with others, sharing what the Lord has done for “me.”

Let’s Speak Up!

Why do we shy away from those in church who are always loudly praising the Lord? Could it be that we haven’t had a strong enough relationship with Him, that He hasn’t really done anything spectacular in our lives? This is not to say that if you don’t jump on a pew or run down an aisle that you aren’t praising the Lord. But it is to say that often the Lord will perform miracles for us, and we do keep our mouths shut, giving Him no glory or honor for what He has done. And if we do say thank You to Him, we don’t share our experience with others, especially the unchurched. Is it fear, or shame, or embarrassment? Let’s explore this: 

1. We aren’t personable? Oh, you might be saying, but I do engage with people, because I do care. But do you care enough about God—and them—to share His intervention in your life that would give them a clearer picture of what kind of God He is?

  • • When was the last time you, for example, shared your experience: The Lord saved your job, or turned on your lights, found your checkbook or keys—again, rather than talk about your unchanging “issues”?
  • • When was the last time you shared with someone how the Lord healed a family member, or how you struggled with doubt or depression, overcame anger or fear, and God stepped in—on time?Think about it. Jesus struggled in the Garden of Gethsemane about not wanting to go through a trial, and Elijah wanted to die when he went through his situation. How much more we struggle but don’t pray or agonize with the Lord as much as they did. Both overcomers, Elijah and Jesus are in the very presence of God. Yet we continue to struggle about sharing God’s grace and goodness.

2. Lack of transparency? Do we think that people would look down on us because it would seem that God had abandoned us? So we fog up the mirror of our life. Yet our challenges—and defeats—could actually be used to strengthen others (Luke 22:32; James 5:16). I’m not talking about sharing your struggles with those you know don’t mean you any good but with those you know who have your best interest at heart. Share “how you made it over” to help others make it over the same mountain.

David understood about sharing his faith. In Psalm 40 he talks about having to wait patiently for the Lord and being in a “horrible pit.” He goes on to say that the Lord brought him out of that pit and established his goings (verses 1-3). He then says in verse 10 that he shared with others what the Lord had done for him. Maybe this is part of why David was a man after God’s own heart.

I am committing to making it my testimony that I share with others what the Lord is doing in my leadership and on my private road to the kingdom. I’m defogging. Is this also your goal?


Gina S. Brown
© 2014 General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists